Upper back pain






All About Upper Back Pain - Spine-Health

6/13/2014
02:46 | Author: Samantha Price

Upper back pain
All About Upper Back Pain - Spine-Health

Upper back pain is not as prevalent as lower back pain, but can be very painful. Examine the common upper back pain causes and treatment options.

There can be an injury to a disc in the upper back (such as a thoracic herniated disc or degenerated disc ) that causes upper back pain, but such injuries are very rare.

It is important to note that the thoracic spine (also called upper back, middle back, or mid-back) is very different in form and function than the cervical spine (neck) or the lumbar spine (lower back). While the neck and lower back are designed to provide us with mobility, the thoracic spine is designed to be very strong and stable to allow us to stand upright and to protect the vital internal organs in the chest. Because this section of the spinal column has a great deal of stability and only limited movement, there is generally little risk of injury or degeneration over time in the upper back.

Because there is little motion and a great deal of stability throughout the upper back (thoracic spine), this section of the spine does not tend to develop common spinal disorders, such as a herniated disc, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, or spinal instability. These conditions can cause upper back pain but are exceedingly rare in the upper back.

The word "thoracic" means pertaining to the chest, and the thoracic spine (also called the upper back or mid-back) is the portion of the spinal column that corresponds to the chest area ( Figure 1 ). In This Article:

Because of this stability and lack of motion, in most cases anatomic causes of upper back pain cannot be found, and an MRI scan or CT scan will rarely image an anatomic problem that is amenable to any sort of surgical solution for the upper back pain.

Although upper back pain is not a very common spinal disorder, it can cause significant discomfort and pain when it does occur. The most common causes of upper back pain are muscular irritation ( myofascial pain ) and joint dysfunction.

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Upper Back Pain Articles and Videos on Symptoms, Causes

4/12/2014
04:52 | Author: Samantha Price

Upper back pain
Upper Back Pain Articles and Videos on Symptoms, Causes

Upper back pain is not as prevalent as lower back pain, but can be very painful. Learn about the common causes and treatment options for pain in your chest.

Because the upper back/thoracic spine area of the spinal column has a great deal of stability and only limited movement, it is far less common than its lower back pain and neck pain counterparts. However, when upper back pain does occur, it can cause significant discomfort. Muscular irritation ( myofascial pain ) and joint dysfunction are often the culprits of upper back pain. Because of its nature, the upper back responds best to manual treatments such as exercise, chiropractic manipulation, massage therapy, or accupuncture. Watch Upper Back Pain Videos.

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Upper and Middle Back Pain-Overview - WebMD

12/21/2014
04:22 | Author: Lauren Wood

Upper back pain
Upper and Middle Back Pain-Overview - WebMD

This topic provides an overview of upper and middle back pain. If you have low back pain or neck pain,see the topic Low Back Pain or Neck.

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Upper and middle back pain can occur anywhere from the base of your neck to the bottom of your rib cage.

Upper and middle back pain may be caused by:

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In rare cases, pain may be caused by other problems, such as gallbladder disease, cancer, or an infection.

Your ribs attach to a long, flat bone in the center of the chest called the sternum and attach to and wrap around your back.

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Upper and Middle Back Pain - What Are the Symptoms of Upper and

10/20/2014
02:24 | Author: Jessica Kelly

Upper back pain
Upper and Middle Back Pain - What Are the Symptoms of Upper and

Information on Upper and Middle Back Pain. Includes topic overview and related information.

In general, symptoms of upper and middle back pain may:

Watchful waiting is a wait-and-see approach. If you get better on your own, you won't need treatment. If you get worse, you and your doctor will decide what to do next. If your back pain is mild to moderate, it probably will get better on its own. You can try home treatment to relieve your symptoms. If you don't feel better in 1 to 2 weeks, call your doctor.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

In most cases, back pain gets better with home treatment. So unless you have signs of a severe illness, injury, or heart attack, you can give your back pain some time to work itself out before you call your doctor.

Health care professionals who often diagnose the cause of back pain include:

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When to Call a Doctor.

More serious symptoms that need to be treated right away include:

Call or other emergency services immediay if:

IN THIS ARTICLE Overview Health Tools FAQs What Causes Upper and Middle Back Pain What Are the Symptoms of Upper and Middle Back Pain When to Call a Doctor Upper and Middle Back Pain Exams and Tests Upper and Middle Back Pain Treatment Overview Home Treatment Other Places To Get Help Related Information References Credits Symptoms.

You can also get care from: Share this Article:

If your back pain is severe or long-lasting, health professionals who can treat you include:

Be sure to call your doctor right away if you start to have other symptoms or you have:

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Upper Back Pain - Back Pain - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments

8/19/2014
12:10 | Author: Lauren Wood

Upper back pain
Upper Back Pain - Back Pain - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments

Learn about Upper Back Pain on , including information on symptoms, causes and treatments.

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Upper back pain occurring with other symptoms, such as chest pain or difficulty breathing, may be a sign of a heart attack and should be immediay evaluated in an emergency setting. In addition, if your pain is extreme, persistent, or causes you concern, contact a medical professional.

Upper back pain may last briefly or it may be chronic, which is defined as lasting more than three months. Your pain may be dull and throbbing or sharp and stabbing. You may be in constant pain, or perhaps the pain occurs only during a particular activity, such as lifting grocery bags or after working at your desk for a prolonged period of time.

In addition to the thoracic spine and shoulder blades, there are numerous nerves, muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the upper back. Any of these structures can become irritated or inflamed in response to a variety of different factors and conditions, such as poor posture, overuse, trauma, arthritis, and bone cancer. However, upper back pain is most often due to muscle irritation or joint problems and is usually not a cause for concern.

Upper back pain is any type of pain or discomfort throughout the back side of the chest and upper abdominal area. The upper back area includes the shoulder blades and where the rib cage connects to the thoracic (chest region) spine. The upper back is also referred to as the middle back or the thoracic spine.

Most people will experience back pain at some point in their lives. However, upper back pain is not as common as lower back pain, which is the most common cause of job-related disability and absenteeism from work, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Upper back pain is not as common because the thoracic spine does not move as much as the spine in the lower back and neck.

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