Statin side effects






Side Effects of Statins - Mercola

11/16/2014
03:04 | Author: Samantha Price

Statin side effects
Side Effects of Statins - Mercola

A recent study shows that 17 percent of patients taking statin drugs have experienced side effects, such as muscle pain and nausea.

That these drugs have proliferated the market the way they have is a testimony to the effectiveness of direct-to-consumer marketing, corruption and corporate greed, because the odds are very high — greater than 1000 to 1 — that if you're taking a statin, you don't really need it.

Due to statins' potential to increase liver enzymes and cause liver damage, it used to be recommended that patients be monitored for normal liver function.

Common Medications and Multiple Drug Combinations Increasingly Linked to Fatal Car Crashes.

Dr.

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Do You Really Need That Statin? This Expert Says No Martha

9/15/2014
01:52 | Author: Samantha Price

Statin side effects
Do You Really Need That Statin? This Expert Says No Martha

Every week in my practice I see patients with serious side effects to statins, and many did not need to be treated with statins in the first place.

Statins are medications that lower cholesterol by inhibiting an enzyme involved in its production by the liver and other organs. First approved by the FDA in 1987, statins are arguably the most widely-prescribed medicine in the industrialized world today -- and the most profitable, representing billions a year in profits to the drug industry. In fact, Lipitor was the world's best-selling drug until its patent expired recently. Yet most trials that prove statins' effectiveness in preventing cardiac events and death have been funded by companies and principle investigators who stand to benefit from their wide use.

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Statin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

7/14/2014
01:28 | Author: Lauren Wood

Statin side effects
Statin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Choosing a statin for people with special considerations The most important adverse side effects are increased concentrations.

They may reduce the risk of esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and possibly prostate cancer. They appear to have no effect on the risk of lung cancer, kidney cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, or bladder cancer.

A link between cholesterol and cardiovascular disease, known as the lipid hypothesis, had already been suggested. Cholesterol is the main constituent of atheroma, the fatty lumps in the wall of arteries that occur in atherosclerosis and, when ruptured, cause the vast majority of heart attacks.

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Statins Might Not Cause Aching Muscles, But Diabetes Risk Is Real

5/13/2014
03:24 | Author: Jessica Kelly

Statin side effects
Statins Might Not Cause Aching Muscles, But Diabetes Risk Is Real

People taking cholesterol-lowering statins often report having muscle pain and other side effects. Many quit taking the pills as a result. But the.

Diabetes is the only harmful side effect linked to statins, the study found, with 3 percent of people on statins being newly diagnosed with diabetes, compared with 2.4 percent of people taking placebos. That means that for every five new cases of diabetes in people taking statins, one is caused by the drug.

People taking cholesterol-lowering statins often report having muscle pain and other side effects. Many quit taking the pills as a result.

The numbers on side effect are curious, especially considering that many of us who aren't cardiologists presume that statins cause muscle problems.

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BBC News - Statin side-effects questioned

3/12/2014
05:40 | Author: Lauren Wood

Statin side effects
BBC News - Statin side-effects questioned

Drugs taken to lower the risk of heart attacks and stroke may have fewer side-effects than claimed, say researchers.

Their review of 83,880 patients, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, indicated an increased risk of type-2 diabetes.

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