Drug abuse






DrugFacts Understanding Drug Abuse and Addiction National

11/24/2014
08:09 | Author: Rachel Bennett

Drug abuse
DrugFacts Understanding Drug Abuse and Addiction National

In fact, because drugs change the brain in ways that foster compulsive drug abuse, quitting is difficult, even for those who are ready to do so. Through scientific.

Revised November 2012.

Drugs contain chemicals that tap into the brain’s communication system and disrupt the way nerve cells normally send, receive, and process information. There are at least two ways that drugs cause this disruption: (1) by imitating the brain’s natural chemical messengers and (2) by overstimulating the “reward circuit” of the brain.

National Institute of Drug Abuse. Understanding Drug Abuse and Addiction Retrieved from /publications/drugfacts/understanding-drug-abuse-addiction.

Drug abuse and addiction have negative consequences for individuals and for society.

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National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

9/23/2014
06:42 | Author: Samantha Price

Drug abuse
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

The mission of NIDA is to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.

Call or:

NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health.

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Drug Abuse MedlinePlus

7/22/2014
04:13 | Author: Taylor Sanders

Drug abuse
Drug Abuse MedlinePlus

Drug abuse is a serious public health problem that affects almost every community and family in some way. Each year drug abuse causes millions of serious.

References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine).

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Drug abuse is a serious public health problem that affects almost every community and family in some way. Each year drug abuse causes millions of serious illnesses or injuries among Americans. Abused drugs include.

Drug abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug abuse in the first place.

Disclaimers Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated on 20 October 2014 Topic last reviewed 5 September 2014.

NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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Drug Abuse and Addiction Signs, Symptoms, and Help for Drug

5/21/2014
02:04 | Author: Jessica Kelly

Drug abuse
Drug Abuse and Addiction Signs, Symptoms, and Help for Drug

If you're worried about your own or a friend or family member's drug use, it's important to know that help is available. Learning about the nature of drug abuse.

Addiction is a complex disorder characterized by compulsive drug use. While each drug produces different physical effects, all abused substances share one thing in common: repeated use can alter the way the brain looks and functions.

Signs and Symptoms of Substance Abuse – Learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of substance abuse in yourself or a loved one. Includes tips for identifying teen drug abuse. (Childhelp).

Addiction and the Brain's Pleasure Pathway: Beyond Willpower – Describes how the brain becomes addicted and why relapse is so common.

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Substance abuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

3/20/2014
12:15 | Author: Taylor Sanders

Drug abuse
Substance abuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

[edit]. Legal drugs are not necessarily safer. A study in 2010 asked drug-harm experts to rank various illegal and legal drugs.

The third edition, published in 1980, was the first to recognize substance abuse (including drug abuse) and substance dependence as conditions separate from substance abuse alone, bringing in social and cultural factors. The definition of dependence emphasised tolerance to drugs, and withdrawal from them as key components to diagnosis, whereas abuse was defined as "problematic use with social or occupational impairment" but without withdrawal or tolerance.

In 1987, the DSM-III R category "psychoactive substance abuse," which includes former concepts of drug abuse is defined as "a maladaptive pattern of use indicated by...continued use despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent social, occupational, psychological or physical problem that is caused or exacerbated by the use (or by) recurrent use in situations in which it is physically hazardous." It is a residual category, with dependence taking precedence when applicable.

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