Benzodiazepines






Benzodiazepines Brand Names and Side Effects - MedicineNet

11/18/2014
02:55 | Author: Taylor Sanders

Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepines Brand Names and Side Effects - MedicineNet

Consumer information about the drug class of medication benzodiazepines side effects, drug interactions, recommended dosages, and storage.

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Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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BENZODIAZEPINES - ORAL side effects, medical uses, and drug

11/18/2014
06:30 | Author: Lauren Wood

Benzodiazepines
BENZODIAZEPINES - ORAL side effects, medical uses, and drug

Consumer information about the medication BENZODIAZEPINES - ORAL , includes side effects, drug interactions, recommended dosages, and storage.

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HOW TO USE: Take with food or milk if stomach upset occurs. Take exactly as prescribed. Do not increase your dose or take more often than prescribed. Tolerance may develop to this medication making it less effective with prolonged use. For insomnia, take 30 to 60 minutes prior to bedtime. Do not stop taking this medication without your doctor's approval. Your dose may have to be gradually decreased if you have been taking it for some time.

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Benzodiazepines Bipolar Disorder What You Need to Know

11/18/2014
04:05 | Author: Taylor Sanders

Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepines Bipolar Disorder What You Need to Know

Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs that are used to help curb insomnia & anxiety. Find out how they treat bipolar disorder.

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Benzodiazepines are often prescribed for short-term use in bipolar people because they slow the nervous system down, helping to ease feelings of anxiousness and nervousness. These drugs have the advantage of taking effect quickly.

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Other side effects include:

Benzodiazepines can be very addictive, and their use must be carefully regulated to avoid addiction and the potential of withdrawal.

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Hypnotics MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

11/18/2014
02:40 | Author: Lauren Wood

Benzodiazepines
Hypnotics MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

These drugs include benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepines. Hypnotics should only be taken under a doctor's direction. They may be unsafe when mixed.

Mahowald MW. Disorders of sleep. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 412.

Newer medications called non-benzodiazepines can improve insomnia with fewer side effects than benzodiazepines. As noted above, however, they sometimes cause dangerous or strange behaviors, such as driving, making phone calls, or eating while asleep. In general, these drugs are recommended for short-term use (1 - 4 weeks), because they may also become addictive.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

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Benzodiazepine use and risk of Alzheimer39s disease case-control

11/18/2014
12:35 | Author: Taylor Sanders

Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepine use and risk of Alzheimer39s disease case-control

Results Benzodiazepine ever use was associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (adjusted odds ratio 1.51, 95% confidence.

People were eligible for inclusion as cases for the study if they met the following criteria: a first diagnosis (index date) of Alzheimer’s disease (ICD-9 (international classification of disease, ninth revision) 331.0) recorded during the study period without any record of another type of dementia at the index date or before; absence of any anti-dementia treatment before index date; and at least six years of follow-up before the index date. Each person with dementia (case) was matched on sex, age group (70-74, 75-79, 80-84, or ≥85), and duration of follow-up (6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 years) at the index date with four controls by using an incidence density sampling strategy.

People without any claim for benzodiazepines during the study time window were categorised as non-users and served as reference for the analyses.

We identified 1796 people as cases (figure ⇓ ) and matched them with 7184 controls, both groups being followed up for at least six years before the index date.

Our study was designed specifically to reduce the possibility of reverse causation bias and to provide additional arguments linking benzodiazepine use with Alzheimer’s disease, such as a dose-effect relation.

Exposure was described according to three criteria:

1-90 PDDs—that is, cumulative exposure ≤3 months 91-180 PDDs—3-6 months.

Characteristics of people with Alzheimer’s disease (cases) and controls (variables assessed five to up to 10 years before diagnosis).

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