Anxiety medication






Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) Treatments and drugs

9/15/2014
06:11 | Author: Rachel Bennett

Anxiety medication
Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) Treatments and drugs

The two most common types of treatment for social anxiety disorder are medications and psychotherapy. These two approaches may be used in combination.

The serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlaine (Effexor XR) also may be an option for social anxiety disorder.

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Several types of medications are used to treat social anxiety disorder. However, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are often the first type of medication tried for persistent symptoms of social anxiety.

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Anxiety Medications for Bipolar Disorder - About.com

7/14/2014
04:18 | Author: Samantha Price

Anxiety medication
Anxiety Medications for Bipolar Disorder - About.com

Anxiety medications, also called anti-anxiety medications or anxiolytics, are prescribed for anxiety disorders as well as for people who have.

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Many SSRI and SNRI antidepressants have a beneficial effect on anxiety. Also, some of the SSRI antidepressants are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat various anxiety disorders with or without depression. These include:

Updated June 15, 2014.

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Anxiety medications may be linked to risk of Alzheimer39s - Fox News

5/13/2014
02:27 | Author: Taylor Sanders

Anxiety medication
Anxiety medications may be linked to risk of Alzheimer39s - Fox News

Chronic use of sedatives and anxiety medications may be linked to Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.

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Chronic use of sedatives and anxiety medications may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests.

The authors caution that the nature of the link between benzodiazepines and Alzheimer’s is not definitive, but that the study’s results “reinforces the suspicion of a possible direct associate, even if benzodiazepine use might also be an early marker of a condition associated with an increased risk of dementia.”

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A Canadian study published in the British Medical Journal examined 1,796 cases of Alzheimer’s in adults over 66 years of age living in Quebec over a six-year period. All of the patients had been prescribed benzodiazepines, drugs used to treat anxiety and insomnia. Scientists then compared each case with 7,184 healthy people. ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT.

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“For people needing or using benzodiazepines, it seems crucial to encourage physicians to carefully balance the benefits and risks when renewing the prescription,” lead researcher Sophie Billioti de Gage of the University of Bordeaux wrote in the report. Advertisement.

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Researchers found that the patients who used benzodiazepines for three months or more increased their risk for suffering Alzheimer’s disease by 51 percent compared to those who did not take the drug. The results found the strength of association increased with longer exposure to benzodiazepines.

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American anxiety The three real reasons why we are more stressed

3/12/2014
12:16 | Author: Jessica Kelly

Anxiety medication
American anxiety The three real reasons why we are more stressed

Around the turn of the millennium, anxiety flew past depression as the their spending on anti-anxiety medications like Xanax and Valium.

This national surge in nerves is somewhat baffling because we're actually safer from true danger than we've ever been. A century ago, psychologist William James wrote that modernity had insulated us so well from grave threats like grizzly bear attacks that "in civilized life … it has at last become possible for large numbers of people to pass from the cradle to the grave without ever having had a pang of genuine fear." Yet James might have been surprised to learn that even as our streets become safer, our cars more crash-proof, and our food and drugs better regulated, we still keep finding ways to become more tense.

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