Anti anxiety pills






Will anti-anxiety meds make me a zombie? Go Ask Alice!

6/9/2014
05:49 | Author: Nick Barnes

Anti anxiety pills
Will anti-anxiety meds make me a zombie? Go Ask Alice!

My question: would taking an anti-phobic or anti-anxiety (not anti-depressant) medication fabricate calm to such an extent that I wouldn't be able to feel and deal.

It used to be that the only prescription drugs available for people with symptoms like yours were extremely addictive and often had zombie-like effects. That's no longer the case. It's now recognized that the balance of chemicals in our brains has a significant effect on our emotional well-being, or lack thereof. As research and understanding has increased in this area, so has the number and variety of drugs available to help people manage their feelings and the physical symptoms that often accompany them.

My question: would taking an anti-phobic or anti-anxiety (not anti-depressant) medication fabricate calm to such an extent that I wouldn't be able to feel and deal with the causes of my stress head on? I'm looking for something to keep me functioning while I work through this, not in finding a chemical solution that I end up dependent on for my happiness and well-being.

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Anti-Anxiety Medications Explained Psychology Today

4/8/2014
07:58 | Author: Lauren Wood

Anti anxiety pills
Anti-Anxiety Medications Explained Psychology Today

Americans' use of anti-anxiety medications has increased dramatically over the past decade, and while medications can play an important role.

Because gabapentin has "gaba" in its name, it is often mistakenly believed to directly affect neurons that use a chemical called GABA to communicate with one another (which is how benzodiazepines work). The exact mechanism by which gabapentin achieves its effects is unknown but may involve binding to a cellular structure that moves calcium across the cell membrane.

SSRIs work by increasing the amount of signaling between neurons that use a chemical called serotonin to communicate with each other. They are also used to treat depression.

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Anti-anxiety drugs and abuse - Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders

12/17/2014
01:13 | Author: Rachel Bennett

Anti anxiety pills
Anti-anxiety drugs and abuse - Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders

Anti-anxiety drugs, or "anxiolytics," are powerful central nervous system (CNS) depressants that can slow normal brain function. They are often prescribed to.

Barbara S. Sternberg, Ph.D. « Anorexia nervosa.

NIDA Notes 16, no. 3 (August 2001).

In addition to the drugs available in the United States by prescription, there are three other drugs that are predominantly central nervous system depressants with significant potential for abuse. These are:

Narcotics Anonymous. PO Box 9999, Van Nuys, CA 91409. (818).

See also Addiction ; Anxiety and anxiety disorders ; ; Barbiturates ; Buspirone ; Chlordiazepoxide ; Clonazepam ; ; Cognitive-behavioral therapy ; Diazepam ; Disease concept of chemical dependency ; Estazolam ; Flurazepam ; Fluvoxamine ; Insomnia ; Lorazepam ; Sedatives and related disorders ; Substance abuse and related disorders ; Support groups ; Triazolam ; Zolpidem.

Ketamine is an anesthetic used predominay by veterinarians to treat animals.

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Alzheimer39s Linked to Sleeping Pills and Anti-Anxiety Drugs TIME

10/16/2014
01:36 | Author: Samantha Price

Anti anxiety pills
Alzheimer39s Linked to Sleeping Pills and Anti-Anxiety Drugs TIME

About 9 million Americans rely on sleeping pills or some sort of sedative to doze off at night, and 11% of middle-aged women take anti-anxiety.

In a report published Wednesday in The BMJ, researchers say that among 1,796 people with Alzheimer’s disease and 7,184 controls, those who have used benzodiazepines showed a 51% higher risk of the neurodegenerative disorder. Among people who took the drugs more than 180 days, the risk escalated to about two-fold higher.

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About 9 million Americans rely on sleeping pills or some sort of sedative to doze off at night, and 11% of middle-aged women take anti-anxiety medications.

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